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Hyperbole is a figure of speech that is an noticeable exaggeration created for result or emphasis.

An exaggerated character herself, the Nurse enters the scene in Act III via yards of apparel recording the wind, prompting Mercutio to speak to out, "A sail, a sail!" Previously in Act I, Scene 3 ,...


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Hyperbole is a figure of speech that is an noticeable exaggeration developed for effect or focus.

An exaggerated character herself, the Nurse enters the scene in Act III through yards of garments recording the wind, prompting Mercutio to speak to out, "A sail, a sail!" Previously in Act I, Scene 3, she employs hyperbole for emphasis to Juliet. As Juliet"s mother argues a husband also to her daughter in the create of the young nobleguy Paris, the Nurse attempts to underscore Paris"s attractiveness by expressing her glowing praise for him:

A guy, young lady! Lady, such a manAs all the world--Why, he"s a guy of wax. 1.3.77-78

With these words, the Nurse tries to convince Juliet that Paris is as good as any kind of male in the people. Additionally, he is as perfect as a wax model; it is as though he were sculpted and also offered perfect features and perfect prosections. Then, after Lady Capulet comments that no summer in Verona is as handsome, the Nurse adds, "He"s a freduced, in confidence, a flower!" (1.3.80)

By this expression she indicates that Paris is as handsome as the summer to which Lady Capulet alludes in the previous line ("Verona"s summer hath not such a flower").


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I’ll lay fourteenager of my teeth –

And yet, to my teen be it spoken, I have actually however four –

She’s not fourteenager.

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The Nurse offers hyperbolic expression to make a joke at her own price in Act 1, scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet. She and Lady Capulet are discussing Juliet’s age, and also the Nurse, having actually elevated Juliet almost from birth, knows her age much better than anyone. First she claims that she will bet her own teeth on Juliet being under 14 – a bet that no one expects her to make in seriousness, after all (she’s really going to have actually teeth pulled if she is somehow wrong?) and also then bemoans the reality that she can’t bet fourteenager teeth bereason she only has actually 4. It’s hyperbole bereason no one is meant to think that the Nurse truly has only four teeth – in truth, unmuch less there’s a great deal of makeup involved, the audience will certainly have the ability to plainly watch that she has more teeth than that – yet tooth loss was very common in old age at the time, and also so the nurse is actually making a self-deprecating joke about her age: so old she just has four teeth left. It’s typical of the Nurse’s breezy, jocrucial mindset in the initially component of the play, an attitude that gets significantly grim and severe as the play progresses toward its tragic finish.